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Vor kurzem hatte ich die Muße ein älteres JavaScript Projekt zu refactoren. Unter anderem sollte die Assertion Bibliothek Jasmine von 1.x auf 2.x aktualisiert werden. Zwei Dinge gab es bei unseren Tests zu refactoren. Einmal die Art von asynchronen Specs und einmal die verwendeten Expectations. Unter http://jasmine.github.io/2.0/upgrading.html wurde super beschrieben was für Änderungen man genau machen muss beim Umstieg von Jasmine 1.x auf 2.x.


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This is the second article of a springboot & reactjs article series about server side rendering and progressive enhancement. In the first article we have learned how to render a ReactJS app on the server with nashorn. However, actually it is not really an "app" yet. Currently we just see a static list of awesome products...


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This is the first article of a series about server side rendering and progressive enhancement. We will implement a product list that can be sorted by two parameters. Furthermore the app will be progressively enhanced, means the html document is rendered on the server and javascript will just enhance the app on the client if possible.


springboot & reactjs article series

  1. server side rendering ✅

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So that's it. Three days, 2.000 Developers from 20 countries, over 140 speakers from around the world, and one outstanding beautiful city. It is for the first time, when Devoxx Poland (previously known as 33rd Degree), one of the most recognizable European Java Conference took place in Krakow, the city of the polish kings, and one of the most important places in whole polish history. It took place from Monday to Wednesday last week in the ICE Conference Center, which is located directly by the Vistula river, with beautiful view over the Wawel Royal Castle.


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In our internal JavaScript 'User Group' (called JS-Posse in honour of the legendary 'The Java Posse' by Dick Wall, Chet Haase et al.), we recently decided to evaluate alternatives to our current JavaScript linting standart, JSHint. Although well established by now among different development teams across synyx, using it never felt 100% comfortable. A quick Google search left us with three alternatives:

  • JSLint by Doug Crockford himself

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Particularly to people using C++ and Python the Qt framework is probably quite well-known, as in these communities it's one of the most-used frameworks for application development. For those who don't know what Qt is or what it does: it's a comprehensive LGPL-licensed framework providing cross-platform support for GUI, network, multimedia, database, sensors, graphics (OpenGL) and many other features. In this article I would like to give a quick overview of these.


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Code gluse

Today's post targets an API, which has been released on Dec. 11, 2006; the javax.scripting package [1] and a lot of good articles that have been written around it.
The intention for this post is not about 'how to use the scripting packaging', but about gluse. So what do I mean with the phrase gluse? Gluse is a coinage
for glue and (re)usage. As many of the Java developer know about the plenty of good libraries from maven central / github and the integration process, a few of them
might ask how to integrate libraries from other languages as well. As many of the every day problems have already bean addressed, there is a good chance that someone else has done the job for you and is willing to share.


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CoffeeScript

Vert.x supports JavaScript through the Rhino JavaScript engine. Although JavaScript is a decent language once you get to know it, I prefer CoffeeScript, a language that compiles to JavaScript. Luckily, vert.x has built-in support for CoffeeScript, so I can use it nearly transparently. You will only notice the JavaScript under the hood when reading stack traces, which will refer to the compiled JavaScript file.


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Event-Driven Concurrency

At synyx, we are looking at vert.x for an upcoming project where we are building a system that will need to scale under load. The tag-line of vert.x is effortless asynchronous application development for the modern web and enterprise, which fits the bill, so I decided to play around with it a little bit.


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Let me tell you a tale about a fat-client application that has nice some time-related logic written in JavaScript. We want to calculate the difference between two dates, measured in days. Easy, you say, just use the Date object and do some calculating.